Cocoon Tree Pod Burial Cost and How To Lower the Price

Georgette Kilgore headshot, wearing 8 Billion Trees shirt with forest in the background.Written by Georgette Kilgore

Eco-Friendly Natural Products | October 19, 2022

Woman scratching her head wonders about cocoon tree pod burial cost while looking at a large dollar with a organic tree pod in the background.

Before you take a natural approach to burial, you should know about how much a cocoon tree pod burial cost will be, and how to lower the price, in relation to a traditional burial, as this will help you decide whether or not this burial option fits your budget.

Tree pod burial is gaining in popularity because of the living memorial they create.

This complete guide explores the ins and outs of cocoon tree pod burial and provides details on cocoon tree pod burial costs, including how to lower the price.

How Much Does the Cocoon Tree Pod Burial Cost?

A cocoon tree pod burial can cost between $400 and $500, base rate.

Depending on the company you choose and the type of organic burial pod you purchase, you can expect to spend $400 or more on the burial pod alone. Remember, this cost does not include burial services or the burial process.

When you include burial services and processes, a full burial with a cocoon tree pod can cost between $1,000 and $2,000.

How Much Do Organic Burial Pods Cost for Humans?

Over the past few years, organic inter pods have grown in popularity, encouraging more and more companies to create organic burial pods for humans.

With so many options, you may have difficulty choosing one that best meets your burial needs.1 Here are three of the most researched and highly-reviewed organic burial pods that are sure to meet your burial needs.

  • Bios Urn

The Bios Urn is an organic burial pod made from biodegradable materials. The Bios Urn comes in two sizes: pet-sized and standard. However, it does not come with a sapling, so you have to source one on your own.

If you opt for the pet-sized Bios Urn, you will purchase it at $99. But, if you opt for the standard-sized Bios Urn, you will buy it at $140.

  • Capsula Mundi

This is an organic burial pod made from biodegradable natural starch plastic. It comes in two colors: sand and white; however, it does not come with a sapling, meaning you have to buy one separately. You can purchase the Capsula Mundi for $330.

  • The Living Urn

This burial pod is made from recycled plant matter. No machinery, chemicals, or glue are involved in the production of The Living Urn. Unlike the Bios Urn and Capsula Mundi, The Living Urn comes with a sapling at an additional cost. You can buy The Living Urn for 129USD.

Why Do Capsula Mundi Burial Pods Cost So Much?

Capsula Mundi burial pods cost more than other burial pods on the market. Here’s why:

Photo of 3 burial pods inside a room with white walls.

  1. Capsula Mundi burial pods are made from 100% biodegradable starch plastic that helps provide nutrients to a tree during infancy.
  2. Capsula Mundi pods revamp the idea of cemeteries.6 Instead of chopping down trees to make caskets, the Capsula Mundi burial pod re-grows your deceased loved one’s body into nature. Your deceased loved one’s body serves as a source of nutrients to the tree planted above it, helping it grow and produce more oxygen.
  3. Burying your deceased loved one in a Capsula Mundi pod is wholesome and allows them to remain close to you. You can plant the pod anywhere in your home that you find sentimental.
  4. Many individuals view death as an end. With the Capsula Mundi, you can connect death to nature and give your deceased loved one a second chance to be around friends and family.

How Much Does a Tree Grave Pod Cost?

Generally, a tree grave pod can cost between $1,000 and $4,000. This cost includes:

  • A Burial Plot
  • A Plot Marker
  • Fees to Open and Close the Grave
  • A One-Time Donation to a Perpetual Care Fund to Maintain the Burial Site

However, this cost does not include the cost of transporting the body or holding a funeral service.

The cost of a tree grave pod for cremated remains ranges between $200 and $1,000. These charges do not include the cost of cremation, which runs between $1,000 and $2,500. Cremation is handled by a crematory, mortuary, or funeral home.

Below is a table of typical tree grave pod items and their associated costs:

ItemCost
Plot$740 – $3,500
Burial$1,000 – $4,000
Opening and Closing the Grave$300 – $700
Ash Burial$200 – $1,100
Ash Scattering$200 – $300
Biodegradable Urn$65 – $350

Is the Cost of a Cocoon Tree Pod Burial Similar to an Organic Burial?

The cocoon tree pod burial cost is higher than an organic burial. Here’s why:

  • Firstly, cocoon tree pods cost more because they can hold a human body without requiring it to be cremated.
  • Secondly, cocoon tree pod burial is more expensive than an organic burial because cocoon tree pods are more time and resource-intensive products.
  • Thirdly, cocoon tree pods offer a more environmentally friendly burial option than other natural burial options, making them more expensive.

Are Tree Pod Burial Prices for Pets Lower Than Tree Burial Pods for Humans?

Tree burial pods for pets are cheaper than burial pods for humans. Even though burial pods for pets are more affordable than humans, they provide the same benefits.

There are not that many burial pods on the market, but the few that are on the market run for as little as $99 and contain everything you need to lay your four-legged friend to rest.

Like tree burial pods for humans, burial pods for pets break down with time, allowing the animal remains to mix with the soil and fertilize the tree above it.

What Are Tree Pod Burial Locations?

A tree pod burial location is an area where deceased loved ones’ bodies are placed within a cocoon tree pod and buried in the ground.

One common requirement in most tree pod burial locations is that the deceased’s body not be embalmed or cremated; however, the rules differ from state to state. So, it would help if you do some research before you settle on a specific tree pod burial location.

The same goes for placing the cremated remains of a deceased loved one in a biodegradable urn and burying them on private property. Some states do not allow natural burial on private land.

Is It Possible To Get a Tree Pod Burial USA?

Yes, you can get a tree pod burial in the United States. You can have your family inter your remains in a biodegradable urn and plant them on a natural burial site or private property. However, it depends on the state.

Each state has its own funerary laws, so ensure that you do your research before you opt for a natural funeral.

Tree Pod Burial Locations: USA

Many states allow individuals to bury human remains on private property. However, most of these states have specific requirements that you must meet and paperwork that you must fill out before burying your deceased loved one on private property.

Screenshot of State of Alaska website page about solid waste program with yellow arrow pointing to burial on private property.

Some states allow you to set a piece of your land aside for home burials, while others do not allow burying human remains on private land.

Below are States that allow burials on private property; however, all these states require you to consult zoning laws before burying human remains on private property or creating a home cemetery.

 

StatePrivate Burial Laws
AlabamaYou must hire a funeral director.
AlaskaYou do not have to hire a funeral director.
ArizonaYou do not need a funeral director, but you must refrigerate or embalm your deceased loved one’s body if you are not going to bury it within 24 hours.
ArkansasArkansas law requires burials in registered cemeteries only, but a licensed funeral director is not required to direct the final arrangements.
CaliforniaYou need a special permit to bury your deceased loved one’s body on private property.
ColoradoYou do not need a funeral director
ConnecticutYou need to hire a funeral director. You are not legally required to embalm the body unless the deceased died from a contagious disease. You can refrigerate the body until burial.
DelawareYou do not need a funeral director.
FloridaYou do not need a funeral director.
GeorgiaYou do not need a funeral director.
HawaiiYou do not need a funeral director.
IdahoYou do not need a funeral director.
IllinoisYou must hire a funeral consultant.
IndianaYou need a special permit for private property burials. You also need to hire a funeral director.
IowaYou do not need a funeral director.
KansasYou do not need a funeral director.
KentuckyYou do not need a funeral director.
LouisianaYou need a special permit to bury your deceased loved one on private property.
MaineYou do not need a funeral director.
MarylandYou do not need a funeral director.
MassachusettsYou do not need a funeral director.
MichiganYou need a special permit to bury the remains of your deceased loved one in tree pods on private property.
MinnesotaYou do not need a funeral director.
MississippiYou do not need a funeral director.
MissouriYou do not need a funeral director.
MontanaYou do not need a funeral director.
NebraskaYou need a special permit to bury your deceased loved one on private property.
NevadaYou do not need a funeral director.
New HampshireYou do not need a funeral director.
New JerseyYou need a special permit to bury your deceased loved one on private property.
New MexicoYou do not need a funeral director.
New YorkYou need a special permit to bury your deceased loved one on private property.
North CarolinaYou do not need a funeral director.
North DakotaYou do not need a funeral director.
OhioYou do not need a funeral director.
OklahomaYou do not need a funeral director.
OregonYou do not need a funeral director.
PennsylvaniaYou do not have to hire a funeral director, but your deceased loved one’s body must be refrigerated if you do not plan to bury it within 24 hours.
Rhode IslandYou do not need a funeral director.
South CarolinaYou do not need a funeral director.
South DakotaYou do not need a funeral director.
TennesseeYou do not need a funeral director. You also do not need a casket or to embalm the deceased’s body: you can freeze the body until you are ready to bury it.
TexasYou do not need a funeral director.
UtahYou do not need a funeral director.
VermontYou do not need a funeral director.
VirginiaYou do not need a funeral director.
WashingtonWashington law requires burials in established cemeteries run by corporations. A licensed funeral director is not required for the final arrangements.
West VirginiaYou do not need a funeral director.
WisconsinYou do not need a funeral director.
WyomingYou do not need a funeral director.

How To Lower the Cocoon Tree Pod Burial Cost

Why does a cocoon tree pod burial cost so much? This is one of the top questions that individuals who want to take a natural approach to burials ask, and rightfully so.

If you want to lower the cocoon tree pod burial price, you should go with cremation tree pods.

Below are several reasons why cremation tree pods are cheaper and better for the environment.

Affordable

The average funeral costs around $7,000 to $12,000.4 If you are on a budget, that is a lot of money to pump into a funeral.

Screenshot of Federal Trade Commission website page about consumer advice with yellow arrow pointing to the funeral costs and pricing checklist.

Cremations tree pods are a cheaper option. Cremation costs between $4,000 and $7,000, and cremation tree pods cost around $129 to $159.

Generally, cremation tree pod burials are 45 to 50 percent cheaper than cocoon tree pod burials.

Moreover, cremation tree pod burials help you avoid the big purchases of items such as caskets and headstones.

Eco-Friendly

Cremation is more eco-friendly than traditional burials. When an individual is buried, they are embalmed using strong chemicals before burial. These chemicals can seep through a casket, creating soil and water pollution.

Additionally, burial plots take up a lot of space and disturb the earth to fit a casket. Cremation tree pods cause no harm to the environment. In fact, cremated remains are eco-friendly and provide nutrients to plants.2

Flexible

With burial, your deceased loved one’s body is either laid to rest above the ground in a mausoleum or underground in a piece of land. With cremation, you can do more than two things with your deceased loved one’s ashes.

You can turn your deceased loved one’s ashes into a tree, mix them with tattoo ink, place some of the ash in memorial jewelry, store them in an urn, or scatter them into a lake or ocean.

Simple

In most cases, when individuals choose a traditional funeral, they also decide to bury their loved ones. On the contrary, cremation is often associated with celebrations of life and memorial services.

Traditional funerals involve several components, including a wake, putting together a team of pallbearers, organizing a mass, and coordinating the burial with a cemetery.

Cremation tree pod burials are simpler. Since the service is based on what you want and not common rituals, you can decide to make the ceremony sophisticated or simple.

Cemetery Availability

Plots at cemeteries are becoming scarce by the day.3 The cemetery you want to bury your loved one in may not have available plots, and if they do, they may cost more than the standard price since demand is high.

Cremation tree pods take up very little space and are less likely to experience price hikes.

The cocoon tree pod burial cost is higher than most natural burial methods. To lower the price, opt for cremation tree pod burials as they offer the same benefits as cocoon tree pod burials while being kind to the environment.

Is the Natural Burial a Good Option?

Natural burial is a great option. Here are the reasons why.

Natural Burial Is Not Complicated

Natural burial ceremonies are advantageous because they are not complicated. Church services and ceremonies at crematories can have lengthy rituals and unnecessary traditions that may seem outdated.

Natural burial ceremonies are simple, down-to-earth, and focus more on celebrating the deceased’s life.

Natural Burial Helps Conserve Wood Resources

Traditional burials that involve wooden caskets are resource-intensive. Precious woods such as cherry, walnut, and mahogany are used to make caskets.

Photo of a burial inside the woods with tall trees using a carriage and a wooden casket while two people discuss the burial rites.

Wooden caskets made from these types of wood do not fulfill green initiatives, making them resource-heavy.

On the other hand, natural burials use caskets made from silk, cardboard, and bamboo wood, which easily break down when buried in the earth.

Natural Burial Is Better for the Environment

A natural burial ground leaves far less of a human footprint.7 The absence of marked graves makes natural burial grounds look like normal fields, apart from a few discreet signs.

Do not let the cost of natural burials prevent you from opting for a green burial.5 This article has answered why the cocoon tree pod burial cost is higher than other organic burial methods and provided alternatives that will help you lower the price of natural burial.

Frequently Asked Questions About Cocoon Tree Pod Burial Cost

How Can I Lower the Cocoon Tree Pod Burial Cost?

You can lower the cocoon tree pod burial cost by choosing cheaper alternatives to natural burial options that provide the same benefits.

Is Cremation an Option With Organic Burial Pods?

Cremation is an option with organic burial pods. Even though funeral directors may slightly alter the process to comply with cemetery rules, cremation is an option for organic burial pods. Many cemeteries allow individuals to bury their deceased loved ones in pods or biodegradable urns made from clay, wood, or paper.

How Much Does the Biodegradable Burial Pod Cost?

Depending on the biodegradable pod you selected, it can cost you between $100 and $400.

Opt for the Natural Funeral?

The choice to go for a natural burial is often impacted by cost. While many individuals want to help protect the environment when they pass away, the cost of a natural burial can fall more on the expensive side.


References

1De Angelis, T. (2004, June 4). Too Many Choices? American Psychological Association. Retrieved September 6, 2022, from <https://www.apa.org/monitor/jun04/toomany>

2Stancil, J. M. (2019, June 3). The Power of One Tree – The Very Air We Breathe. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Retrieved September 6, 2022, from <https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2015/03/17/power-one-tree-very-air-we-breathe>

3Scott, M. (2020, June 19). Green Burial: The Last Footprint. Glasgow Caledonian New York College. Retrieved September 6, 2022, from <https://www.greenburialcouncil.org/uploads/1/2/4/2/124231485/green_burial_the_last_footprint_mallory_scott.pdf>

4U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics. (2022). TED: The Economics Daily image. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved September 6, 2022, from <https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/>

5Bouverette, A. A. (2017, December). Green Burials: The Deinstitutionalization of Death. The Hilltop Review. Retrieved 2022, from <https://scholarworks.wmich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1264&context=hilltopreview>

6Carlson, J. N. (2017, September 21). Green Grass Above Me. Journalism Student Works. Retrieved September 13, 2022, from <https://scholarworks.uark.edu/jourstuwo/1/>

7Wikipedia. (2022). Human Footprint. Wikipedia. Retrieved September 13, 2022, from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Footprint>